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Citric acid urine test
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Citric acid urine test

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Urine - citric acid test

Citric acid urine test measures the level of citric acid in urine.

I Would Like to Learn About:

  • How the Test is Performed

    You will need to collect your urine at home over 24 hours. Your health care provider will tell you how to do this. Follow instructions exactly so that the results are accurate.

  • How to Prepare for the Test

    No special preparation is necessary for this test. But the results are affected by your diet, and this test is usually done while you are on a normal diet. Ask your health care provider for more information.

  • How the Test will Feel

    The test involves only normal urination, and there is no discomfort.

  • Why the Test is Performed

    The test is used to diagnose renal tubular acidosis and evaluate kidney stone disease.

  • Normal Results

    The normal range is 320 to 1240 milligrams per 24 hours.

    Normal value ranges may vary slightly among different laboratories. Some labs use different measurements or test different samples. Talk to your doctor about the meaning of your specific test results.

  • What Abnormal Results Mean

    A low level of citric acid may mean renal tubular acidosis and a tendency to form calcium kidney stones.

    The following may decrease urine citric acid levels:

    • Chronic kidney failure
    • Diabetes
    • Excessive muscle activity
    • Medicines called angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE inhibitors)
    • Parathyroid glands do not produce enough of its hormone (hypoparathyroidism)
    • Too much acid in the body fluids (acidosis)

    The following may increase urine citric acid levels:

    • A high carbohydrate diet
    • Estrogen therapy
    • Vitamin D
  • Risks

    There are no risks with this test.

Related Information

  Proximal renal tub...RenalAcidosisHypoparathyroidism...DiabetesChronic kidney dis...CarbohydratesVitamin D     Diabetes - type 1...Vitamins

References

Israni AK, Kasiske BL. Kidney disease: glomerular filtration rate, urinalysis, and proteinuria. In: Taal MW, Chertow GM, Marsden PA, et al., eds. Brenner and Rector's The Kidney. 9th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Elsevier Saunders; 2011:chap 25.

McPherson RA, Ben-Ezra J. Basic examination of urine. In: McPherson RA, Pincus MR, eds. Henry's Clinical Diagnosis and Management by Laboratory Methods. 22nd ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Elsevier Saunders; 2011:chap 28.

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Review Date: 11/5/2013  

Reviewed By: Charles Silberberg, DO, Private Practice specializing in Nephrology, Affiliated with New York Medical College, Division of Nephrology, Valhalla, NY. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Bethanne Black, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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